Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets


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What is Facility Management?

Critical assets are unique to each organization. The following questions can help determine what is critical to an organization:. Organizations are encouraged to conduct a thorough review of any previous insider incidents or patterns of misconduct that impacted their assets. This process can help to highlight potential vulnerabilities. Skip to Main Content. Identify and Document Organizational Assets. Leverage a structured asset management process to inventory organizational assets.

The following questions can help determine what is critical to an organization: If compromised, will it impact workforce or public safety? Is it worth it to protect the asset? Probably, and this book tells how. Included are case histories, models and samples to show exactly what is needed to perform a risk assessment and if secu- rity improvement is needed, it tells how to do it.

It includes how to assess perimeter security, types of building construction, doors, walls and other openings and how to control and protect them. It includes detailed explanations of door hardware and control, locksets and key management.


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  • Comprehensive Solutions to Protect People, Facilities, and Assets.

Also includes costs and replace- ment of door hardware and keys. It includes assessment of per- XIX sonnel doors and vehicle doors for commercial and industrial facilities. The book goes further into access control by explaining how locks work and which ones are more secure than others and why. It explains how to assess the risk to a facility and whether or not to upgrade door hardware, how to do it and how much it will cost. The book has guides, illustrations and lessons learned to help make the best and most cost effective decisions for a facility.

The material includes all of the newer types of electronic hardware for door control, pass keys, electronic locks, card read- ers and many of the more recent electronic devices used by em- ployees for access into buildings or into controlled spaces within buildings. It explains how these systems work and how to have them installed.

It also provides information on the latest com- puter systems used to track personnel, use of card readers and how to provide access control for a facility using these new sys- tems. However, the book does not stop with getting in. It goes on to discuss intrusion detection devices and how they work. It also addresses other types of intrusion detection equipment like infra- red sensors, ultrasonic listening devices, microwave transmitters, smart wire fences and many more types of applications. Included are the many applications of closed circuit televi- sion systems CCTV and how they work, how they are installed and how much they cost.

What type of cameras does a facility need to consider when buying? It includes samples of different types of CCTV cameras and what the limitations are. It also covers the electronic applications of integrating these systems and the hardware and software to support them. How effective are they, how much do they cost and are they worth it?

This book addresses the power supplies for these integrated systems and how to make sure they are robust enough to support even the most difficult applications. The book provides guides to badge personnel, how to set up a badging program and how long it takes to badge employees. What questions can legally be asked and where to store the infor- mation. The book also provides information on setting up a drug testing program.

The book provides insights into management of XX security forces, guards and the trade-offs of hiring internal guard staff or contracting this service out. Lessons learned provide in- sight into the advantages and disadvantages of each type of pro- gram. The book also provides guides into setting up an emergency response program. Facility Manager's Guide to Security: Protecting Your Assets is full of guides, charts, surveys and illustrations to make your job more cost effective and easier. Included are case histories and lessons learned that can be applied to every facility.

The first task begins with a Threat Assessment in Chapter 1.

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Enjoy your new security. Not all facilities are alike, however, security at each facility must be tailored for that facility The following tables are meant to be used as a guide. Table is a list of typical facilities and Table is a list of common security measures taken at those typical facilities. In addition to an explanation of the terms in the tables, this chapter includes some typical case histories for facility upgrades. Finally, many facilities are a combination of types of facilities indicated the two tables.

A facility may have a dam and a campsite in it or a resort may include a medical clinic on its grounds.

Help protect people, facilities and assets with integrated security

This is often accomplished by separating the property where the assets are from the public. Most commonly this is done with fencing the perimeter and controlling access into or out of the site. In some facilities it is neither practical nor feasible to sepa- rate the property. For example, restaurants or hotels rely upon customers coming and going for business and hence physical separation isn't feasible. A typical hotel. A hotel is an example of a facility that needs physical security. Photo by Robert Reid, assets within the property by physical separation inside.

This is usually done by separating areas within the facility and control- ling access to the assets with secured doorways.

Depending upon the sensitivity of the asset, the level of security for the doorway can be increased. Extra door security can be provided by locks, electronic surveillance or even the presence of armed guards. The sophistication of the door locks and the key control is another factor affecting the level of security that can be attained. In later chapters the book will explain the security possibilities for doors more extensively but for now the type of facility reflects what has been accepted in the industry.

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As with doors, windows serve the occupants of a facility with light and environmental control. Many facilities have win- dows that do not open, and environmental control is provided by the facility air conditioning and heating systems, but older facilities have windows that can be opened. Another facet of windows is that they can be broken by an aggressor and access gained through the opening.

So the presence of windows and the level of security for the facility can be affected by the size Threats to Facilities 3 and type of windows. A facility can have an extra area of protection by having a safe or a vault on the premises. Some facilities may have them and others will not. Intrusion detection has become more sophisticated with the use of cameras, infrared scanners and sound measuring devices.

However, Intrusion Detection Systems only notify the security force of intrusion, there is no notification of anything other than someone moving around within the pro- tected area. In a different type of facility these systems aren't necessary or beneficial.

For example, an Intrusion Detection Sys- tem would not be practical in an all night restaurant or in a facil- ity where there are people constantly working. Facilities may benefit from enhanced lighting in the parking lot, especially if the employees are concerned about violence in the neighborhood. However, for a facility that does little at night and has very few people working outside of routine business hours, parking lot lighting might not be a good choice. Night lighting, also, affects the performance of Closed Circuit Television Cameras so there is a relationship between the CCTV system and the lighting systems.

Finally, to enhance security, a facility may need a security force. In some cases the security force may carry weapons, i. Employees may need badges to separate staff from guests and finally, depending upon the work performed in the facility, it may be necessary to have some type of security background check performed on the employees and visitors.

These elements are all discussed more thoroughly in later chapters with specifics on how to determine whether these sys- tems are effective and whether to modify them.

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The information presented here is for facility managers and risk assessment teams to get a feel for the facility and the types of security systems that may be required. Some threats are low in one type of facility while that threat might be greater in a different facility. Property Loss A common threat in many facilities is property loss.

Property loss includes loss that results from events like fires or floods.

What Are the Security Risks for My Facility?

High winds can damage property and cause a loss. In addition people misplace things. The items may have been taken by another per- son or they may just be lost. A hotel is an example where property loss occurs. The facility has many transients, people who come and go, some who are accountable to the facility, and some who are not. In general property loss includes small items like luggage, parcels, handbags and laptop computers that are inadvertently left behind. Depending upon the location and type of facility, risk of property loss can be large or small.

Figure A high school is a typical facility that needs security. Photo by Robert Reid, Table Typical threats to facilities. However, in a facility such as an office where there are few guests and the staff knows each other the chances of a theft are lower than in a facility where there is a lot of transient traffic. For a factory that makes large items like, for example, air compres- sors, the odds of a theft of one of these units is smaller than the theft of employee personal items or hand tools.

Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets
Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets
Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets
Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets
Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets
Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets
Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets
Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets
Facility Managers Guide To Security: Protecting Your Assets

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